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Rudyard Kipling

Joseph Rudyard Kipling

Born 30 December 1865; Died 18 January 1936

English poet, short-story writer and novelist

Rudyard Kipling was born in Bombay, India, on 30 December 1865.

In 1892, Kipling married Caroline Balestier and the couple moved to Vermont, USA, where her family lived.  Their two daughters were born there and Kipling wrote 'The Jungle Book' (1894).  In 1896, a quarrel with his wife's family prompted Kipling to move back to England and he settled with his own family in Sussex.  His son John was born in 1897.

By now Kipling had become an immensely popular writer and poet for children and adults.  His books included 'Stalky and Co.' (1899), 'Kim' (1901) and 'Puck of Pook's Hill' (1906).  The 'Just So Stories' (1902) were originally written for his daughter Josephine, who died of pneumonia aged six.

In 1907, Kipling accepted the Nobel Prize for Literature, the first English author to be so honoured.

In 1902, Kipling bought a 17th century house called Bateman's in East Sussex where he lived for the rest of his life.   He also travelled extensively, included repeated trips to South Africa in the winter months.

In 1915, his son, John, went missing in action while serving with the Irish Guards in the Battle of Loos during WWI.  Kipling had great difficulty accepting his son's death - having played a major role in getting the chronically short-sighted John accepted for military service - and subsequently wrote an account of his regiment, 'The Irish Guards in the Great War'.  He also joined the Imperial War Graves Commission and selected the biblical phrase inscribed on many British War memorials: 'Their Name Liveth For Evermore'

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